#WOWLDN | Do Women Dream of a Different Future? Women and Science Fiction

The Women of the World Festival is back at London’s Southbank Centre 9-11 March. I’ll be talking about the futures women dream of with Fiona Sampson MBE, author GX Todd, and Leila Abu El Hawa of the Post-Apocalyptic Book Club and Dark Societies. We’ll be chaired by Una McCormack, best-selling SF author, academic and lecturer.

Here’s what the lovely folk who organise WOW have to say about the panel:

From the The Handmaid’s Tale to The Power and The Hunger Games to Noughts & Crosses, women’s writing has drawn on history to imagine different futures in sci-fi and fantasy writing. With grim comparisons being drawn with dystopian fiction and our current political climate, and as technology and science begin to make what seemed impossible a reality, what can speculative fiction tell us about our world today? On the bicentenary of the publication of Frankenstein – written by a 19 year old Mary Shelley in 1818 and often called the first true work of science fiction– we talk to the women who rule sci-fi and fantasy right now to help us imagine a gender equal world.

I’d love to tell you to go buy tickets, but they’re already sold out! If you were quick enough to get yourself a Saturday or weekend pass, please join us in the Level 4 Blue Bar from 13.15-14.15. If not – well, I was on another standing-room-only WOW panel in 2015 which the festival recorded and posted online very shortly afterwards. Hopefully they’ll do the same again.

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April. Back in the Hole.

I quipped to a friend recently that my March workload, if not my public appearance schedule, is following me into April. I was so busy last month I barely had time to talk about things as they happened – I only managed quick posts about the WOW Festival and University of Notre Dame appearances. I can report that the North London Lit Fest was also rather wonderful: after ninety minutes of conversation there was a further hour of recorded interviews with Aliette de Bodard and myself, mostly intended to be a resource for students but which will also (I think) crop up in promos for next year’s Lit Fest. I also had a great time at the HOLDFAST anthology launch party, where I did a somewhat guerilla reading from Regeneration to a very appreciative audience. In between I attended Farah Mendlesohn’s intriguing BSFA interview with fabulist and poet Suniti Namjoshi, and finally made it to a session of the Super Relaxed Fantasy Club, where I got to drink wine, listen to readings, and have no responsibilities whatsoever.

That lasted for all of a day. Binary is now out in the UK in paperback (does a happy dance), and in honour of the occasion I was invited to guest post by a couple of bloggers who admire my books. Asking the Next Question is about the challenge, and the opportunity, of writing an unplanned sequel; while it deals specifically with how I took the Gemsigns story forward into Binary, I think it has a more general relevance. Plausible Fictions and Strange Realities grew out of a conversation I had at Loncon; it talks about what types of speculation readers find easier to accept, and how much of that is down to a greater comfort level with simply seeing more of what we’ve seen before. Anyone with a passing interest in the vexed question of what constitutes ‘real’ SF might find it worth their while. And with Binary out in the US in exactly a month (yikes!), I’ve also written a post to coincide with that. I won’t pre-empt mine host by telling you where it’ll appear or what it’s about, but it is rather fun …

I was very honoured to have been asked last year to be one of the judges for the 2015 James White Award, but I didn’t want to announce it ahead of the organisers doing so. And there were delays on their end for various reasons, not least because, despite a submissions period of over six months, the majority of the 255 submissions were received in the final two weeks. That made winnowing them down into a shortlist a frankly mammoth task; but they got there in the end, and Dave Hutchinson and Gareth Powell and I read and deliberated, and a winner has been chosen. The announcement is traditionally made alongside the BSFA Awards, so I expect you’ll hear the news on that one this very evening.

Rereading the above I truly don’t know how it’s been possible, but I have also, since finishing Regeneration structural edits, written a short story (which turned out to be rather less short than I anticipated). It’s for a Jo Fletcher Books’ Secret Project and I finished it yesterday, which means I don’t actually know what I think about it yet. But I won’t have time to think about it at all for a while, because *sigh* Regeneration copy edits are back, and there are still a couple of character and plot elements that need tweaking, and with the July pub date just around the corner in delivery terms there’s no time to waste; so this entire post has really been a long-winded way of saying I’m diving back into the black hole of editing for a couple of weeks. See you on the other side.

March! and the end of hibernation

February passed in a blur of editing, and it ain’t over yet – I’m stealing a few minutes to post this before I get back to turning Regeneration from a decent draft into a manuscript fit for publication. (Someday I must write something wry and witty about the paradox of struggling to generate as many words as possible during the writing, only to then delete as many words as possible during the editing. When I have time and wit to spare.)

Finishing isn’t the only reason I’ve been looking forward to March. A number of cool things are happening this month:

The Women of the World (WOW) Festival runs 1-8 March 2015 at the Southbank Centre. I’m on the provocatively titled panel discussion Hollywood, Sci-Fi, Computer Games & Rape next Saturday, 7th March from 12-1pm, along with Joanna Bourke, Professor of History at Birkbeck College; Laurel Sills, editor of Holdfast Magazine; and David Moore of Abaddon Books. We’ll be chaired by Helen Lewis, deputy editor of the New Statesman, and will be discussing why so many plotlines across so many platforms revolve around cruelty and sexual violence against women. It’s a difficult, emotive and necessary topic; I’m very honoured to have been asked to participate. The entire festival is wonderful, so get yourself a ticket (Day Pass is only £20 and gets you into everything all day long except the Stand Alone events).

Next up is an event that isn’t public, but I’m so pleased about it I’m going to mention it anyway: on 17th March I’ll be giving a talk to students who are reading Gemsigns as part of “London in the Literature of the Fantastic”. The course is being taught by Anthony Keen at the University of Notre Dame’s London Undergraduate Program. They’ll also be reading E. Nesbit, The Phoenix and the Carpet; P.L. Travers, Mary Poppins; John Wyndham, The Day of the Triffids; Neil Gaiman, Neverwhere; Kate Griffin, A Madness of Angels; Paul Cornell, London Falling; Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie, The Wicked and the Divine; and watching Doctor Who: The Web of Fear.

On 24th March I’ll be at the North London Lit Fest, in conversation with Farah Mendlesohn and Aliette de Bodard. When Farah contacted me about this she said we’d be talking about migrations and crossing boundaries, so come for what I imagine will be a wide-ranging discussion!

And finally, on 26th March I’ll be popping along to the HOLDFAST Anthology launch party. Laurel and Lucy have done an excellent job with the magazine in its first year, and I’m looking forward to celebrating their latest milestone. There will be wine and books and readings and wine. It’s a fitting start to spring.

  • I love stories.
    My new novel, Sacred, is all about them. Publication info will be posted as soon as I have it.

    In the meantime check out Gemsigns, Binary and Regeneration, available wherever good books are sold.

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